Desegregating NYC: 12 Steps Toward a More Inclusive City

Desegregating NYC: 12 Steps Toward a More Inclusive City

New York City rightfully takes pride in its diversity. However, fifty years after the Fair Housing Act of 1968, ourcity remains sharply segregated. While most other cities around the country have became more integrated over the past three decades, NYC has not. And our schools are among the most segregated in the country.

Segregation is corrosive, for both opportunity and democracy. Extreme levels of segregation—like those we have in NYC today—perpetuate racialized inequality, since residential mobility and high-quality public schools are primary avenues of social mobility. 

Public policies in housing, education, and infrastructure helped to create a segregated New York City. Fifty years after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the passage of the Fair Housing Act, they must help to desegregate it.

To confront that reality, City Council Member Brad Lander (in partnership with 10 City Council colleagues) released Desegregating NYC: 12 Steps Toward a More Inclusive City. The report outlines housing, education, and infrastructure policies to achieve a more integrated city.

Read the press release & summary here

Download the report here. 

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