Jobs & Economic Development

New York City needs job policies that makes work pay for New Yorkers, and build a fair economy for all of us. By guaranteeing paid sick leave for all workers, supporting the rights of independent and low-wage workers, retaining good jobs that are pathways to the middle class like manufacturing, and reforming low-road economic development subsidies so they create living wage jobs, New York can regain its place as the largest engine of economic mobility for the United States.

Statement on Long Island College Hospital

Statement to the SUNY Board of Trustees on the
Proposed Closure of Long Island College Hospital

Chairman McCall, members of the Board of Trustees, while I appreciate the opportunity to testify today, I must start by strenuously objecting to the rushed nature of this hearing, which denies many members of my community the opportunity to comment, and undermines the integrity of your public process.

I am here today to plead with you to reconsider your plan to close Long Island College Hospital. It is the wrong plan. It will do real harm to families and to our community. It is a long-term abandonment of essential health care infrastructure. And it unfortunately raises serious questions about SUNY Downstate’s intentions at the time of its acquisition of LICH in 2011. Read more »

Council passes resolution on DC fiscal debate

Lander Welcomes City Council Resolution Calling for a Federal Fiscal Deal that Prioritizes Broadly-Shared Prosperity

City Councilmember Brad Lander issued the following statement in response to the City Council’s vote in favor of a resolution calling for a Federal deal on long-term debt reduction that would avert short-term damage to an already struggling economy, minimize additional burdens on middle and low income families, and prioritize broadly-shared economic recovery:

As President Obama and Congress continue negotiations to avert the “fiscal cliff,” we need a deal that promotes economic fairness and long-term, broadly-shared prosperity. That means repealing the Bush-Era Tax Cuts on the wealthiest households, protecting the social safety net, and investing in job creation and the nation’s infrastructure. Read more »

Audio: Credit Checks on Job Applicants

The Brian Lehrer Show
12/03/2012

Brooklyn City Councilman (D-39) Brad Lander talks about a proposal he's co-sponsoring to ban the use of credit checks during hiring in New York City. Plus,Emmett Pinkston talks about how an error on his credit report disqualified him for a job with the Transportation Security Administration two years ago.

Signs of recovery

It took more than two weeks, but most of our neighbors in Red Hook finally have power, and more and more public housing buildings are getting their heat restored each day. Residents are rightfully angry that it took this long - and there will be a time soon to look at what happened, what should have been done differently, who’s accountable for it, and what we need to learn for the future. But I’m sure glad to see the progress. Read more »

Behind the Scenes of Participatory Budgeting in District 39

By Rachel Fine of the Participatory Budgeting District Committee 

As a District Committee member, I have been focusing on getting the word out about participatory budgeting and engaging our district’s diverse communities in this process. Although the past few weeks have been a whirlwind of activity getting ready for the neighborhood assemblies, our outreach efforts have targeted a number of communities. Read more »

Hurricane Recovery: Ways to Help Sunday

Here are some ways you can help out with hurricane relief efforts today (Sunday, November 4) at the two evacuation shelters in Park Slope, in Coney Island, and in Red Hook:

Read more »

Self-government's appeal

Brooklyn Daily Eagle
10/03/2012

So who knows our neighborhood needs better than we do? A rhetorical question, of course, but one that gets at the heart of a City Council initiative called Participatory Budgeting.

In 2011-2012, Brad Lander was one of four NYC Councilmembers leading their districts in a program first hatched in Brazil and launched in this country in Chicago. The success of the actions taken in NYC’s four forward-thinking districts led to the program’s doubling—eight councilmembers, representing over one million New Yorkers, have dedicated a total of at least $10 million in NYC discretionary capital funds for the 2012-2013 program. It is we, the constituents, who decide how the money is spent. Read more »

Participatory Budgeting is Back

One year ago, we started an experiment: to give New Yorkers the power to decide how to spend $1 million of their tax dollars on projects in the neighborhood.

That experiment, Participatory Budgeting, was a huge success. Over 3,000 people participated, we received nearly a thousand ideas for projects in the community, and our small voting sites were overwhelmed with eager residents wanting to be part of what the New York Times called “revolutionary civics in action.” The seven projects with the most votes – projects for local schools, libraries, parks, and streets – received City funding and are moving forward.

Now we are starting again, with another $1 million and your great ideas. Read more »

Calling for a Windsor Terrace Grocery Store

As soon as Walgreens announced that it will be replacing Windsor Terrace's only grocery store with one of its drug stores, residents began organizing in support of a grocery store in their neighborhood. Today, they are launching a new website, greenbeansnotwalgreens.org and you can sign a petition in support of a grocery store for Windsor Terrace here.

A city budget we can be proud of

The City Council and Mayor Bloomberg reached an agreement this week on New York City’s Fiscal Year 2013 budget – one that invests in our kids and preserves funding for vital public services.

The City’s $68.7 billion budget is a statement of our priorities, and I am proud that those priorities reflect a deep belief in education (public schools continue to be the largest item by far), in core public services and infrastructure that make sure we have safe and vibrant communities, and in a strong safety net for those who need it (young, old, and in-between).

I’m also excited that, for the first time, the City’s budget includes items that you selected, through participatory budgeting. The seven items – totaling $1 million – that more than 2,200 of you voted for in March are being officially adopted as part of the City’s capital budget this week … and we’re launching a new webpage to keep you posted on their progress. Read more »