Public Safety

The 39th District is lucky to have the officers of the 66th, 72nd, 76th, and 78th Precincts keeping us safe. Working with law enforcement and citizen groups, we can make sure that all of us feel safe on the streets and in our homes.

A big week at City Hall

It’s been an exciting week at City Hall, and I wanted to let you know some of what we’ve been up to.

Community Safety Act
Yesterday, we had a momentous vote to overturn Mayor Bloomberg’s veto of the Community Safety Act. This legislation, of which I am a lead co-sponsor (along with my friend and colleague, Council Member Jumaane Williams), will create an NYPD Inspector General (just plain good government) and strengthen the City’s ban on discriminatory policing. The stronger ban will be truly enforceable and will cover all New Yorkers, including LGBTQ residents, immigrants, and the homeless. Read more »

Residents Bring Ocean Pkwy Petition to Governor

NEW YORK, NY - Earlier today, Council Member Brad Lander, Kensington neighborhood residents, and transportation safety advocates, delivered the ‘Our neighborhood is not a highway’ petition directly to Governor Cuomo’s Manhattan office. The petition calls on the New York State Department of Transportation to sign-off on a safety plan to address crash-prone intersection at Church Avenue and Ocean Parkway, where a pedestrian was killed earlier this summer. Read more »

Thursday morning, 3 a.m. (12 hours to the override vote)

Four years ago this month, I wrote many of you my first “Early morning, 3 a.m.” email. I was up late in Foley Square, as part of an interfaith vigil against homelessness. I was restless, and angry at the crisis of homelessness (though at the time, there were 12,000 fewer homeless New Yorkers than there are tonight). But I was also hopeful. I wrote again at 3 a.m. on the night before the 2009 election, one more time restless but hopeful, that we might be able to do a little good. Read more »

How The NYPD Monitor And Likely IG Will Handle Stop-and-Frisk

Wall Street Journal
08/14/2013

If the New York City Council overrides Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s veto of a bill to create an inspector general for the Police Department next week, that person is unlikely to be involved, at least initially, in overseeing the city’s stop-and-frisk policy because a federal monitor will be handling that issue, one of the bill’s chief sponsors said. Read more »

Community Safety Act sponsors say City Council bills still needed despite stop and frisk ruling

Metro US
08/12/2013

Councilman Brad Lander, who spearheaded two controversial NYPD-related City Council bills along with Councilman Jumaane Williams lauded today’s court decision ruling stop and frisk unconstitutional but said the City Council bills are still very much needed.

The bills would institute broader and more stringer regulations against biased-based profiling and install an Inspector General with sweeping oversight over the NYPD. Read more »

Statement on “Stop-and-Frisk” Ruling

Contact: Alex Moore
718-499-1090
amoore [at] council [dot] nyc [dot] gov

NEW YORK, NY – City Council Member Brad Lander issued the following statement in response to Judge Shira Scheindlin’s ruling in Floyd v. City of New York, which found the NYPD’s “stop-and-frisk” program unconstitutional. Judge Scheindlin appointed a federal monitor to reform the program, which “will be specifically and narrowly focused on the City’s compliance with reforming the NYPD’s use of stop and frisk.” Read more »

Councilmember Lander Statement on Attempted Abduction in Carroll Gardens

BROOKLYN, NY - City Councilmember Brad Lander had the following statement following the arrest of a suspect in Monday morning’s attempted abduction in Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn:

“Earlier this week, there was an attempted abduction in Carroll Gardens. Thanks to the extraordinarily brave action of the attempted victim, she escaped without serious harm. Thanks to the rapid and diligent work of the officers and detectives of the 76th Precinct, the suspect was arrested and identified within 24 hours. I want to express the deep gratitude of our community to the NYPD officers at the 76th, who work so hard every day to keep us safe.

“The attack reminds of the need for all of us to be vigilant against violence in our community, and especially violence against women. We are fortunate to have many organizations in our community who help in standing up to violence, including the Center for Antiviolence Education, Hollaback, Sanctuary for Families, Safe Homes Project, and our local precinct community councils. As we approach 'National Night Out' next week, this is a good time to get involved with anti-violence efforts. If you are interested in getting involved in any of these efforts, please contact my office at (718) 499-1090 or lander [at] council [dot] nyc [dot] gov." Read more »

From the White House to the jail house – a busy week!

Lander and activists block traffic at the Brooklyn Bridge

This summer has been one of the busiest periods in my time on the City Council. While working to pass landmark legislation in the Council and protect our community institutions in the district

I had a number of exceptional experiences this week that I wanted to share with you. Read more »

Civil Disobedience to Defend our Hospital

Today, I was arrested while standing up to the illegal closure of Long Island College Hospital.

With LICH nurses and other workers from SEIU 1199 and the New York State Nurses Association, the National Action Network, and other community members, we blocked traffic to draw attention to the increasingly dire situation at the hospital.

Civil disobedience was central to many important struggles in our nation’s history, including in the civil rights movement. But the decision to risk arrest for what is right is not something I take lightly. Read more »

Response to Mayor Bloomberg’s “Veto Message”

New Yorkers have long-called for more accountable, respectful policing. Under the Bloomberg administration, the number of stops under the NYPD’s Stop-and-Frisk program grew from 97,296 stops in 2002 to 685,724 stops in 2011. Nearly 90% of those stopped are Black and Latino. With a national conversation underway about the dangers of racial profiling, now is the time for New York City to act. Read more »