Public Transit and Livable Streets

A more robust, efficient and fully-funded public transportation system is key to sustainable growth for our community, and for the city and region as a whole. At the same time, there are simple things we can do to make our city's streets safe for pedestrians, bikers and drivers alike. With more frequent subway and bus service, with safer and more better-planned streets, we can have both a metropolis that really works, and neighborhoods that are more livable day-to-day.

Participatory Budgeting Offers Chance to Vote for Livable Streets Projects

Streetsblog
03/18/2013

Eight city council members have put a portion of their discretionary capital funds up for a vote as part of an exercise in participatory budgeting, which allows residents to decide how the money will be spent in their own neighborhoods. Votes in each district are approaching soon, and there’s an opportunity to support livable streets projects.

The participating council members are David Greenfield, Brad Lander, Stephen Levin, and Jumaane D. Williams of Brooklyn; Dan Halloran, Eric Ulrich, and Mark Weprin of Queens; and Melissa Mark-Viverito of Manhattan. Each has put up $1 million in discretionary capital funds, with residents submitting ideas that will appear in early April on a final ballot, open to district residents age 16 and older.

In Lander’s district, stretching from Cobble Hill to Borough Park, there are five projects related to pedestrian safety and livable streets Read more »

NYPD Crash Investigation Policy Changes

Statement by Council Member Brad Lander on NYPD Announcement of Changes in Crash Investigation Policies

I welcome Commissioner Kelly's steps to make sure that traffic crashes that result in serious injuries get an actual investigation. If these policies were already in effect, the crashes that claimed the lives of Clara Heyworth and Stefanos Tsigrimanis would likely have gotten a serious investigation.

In a city where traffic crashes kill as many people as are murdered by guns, reducing traffic fatalities and injuries must be a top priority, and the NYPD has an important role to play here through investigations and enforcement. Read more »

A Business Improvement District for 7th Avenue

I’m happy to report that a group of business owners, property owners, residents, and local leaders have come together and – with support from my office – put forward a plan for a new Business Improvement District (BID) on 7th Avenue in Park Slope. As proposed, the new 7th Avenue BID would stretch from St. John's Place to 16th Street, and will be dedicated to making one of our neighborhood’s major commercial strips cleaner, greener, and safer. Read more »

Lander Cheers More Frequent Service for B61 Bus

Following a string of improvements in response to December 2011 report and labor-community campaign, MTA adds additional service in AM, midday

Brooklyn, NY – City Councilmember Brad Lander applauded an MTA plan to add additional buses to Brooklyn’s B61 bus route, improving service during AM rush hour and midday. The changes will go into effect in April. Read more »

Councilmembers Call for “Bus Clocks” at NYC Bus Stops

It’s an age-old question, “Where’s my bus?”

Today, City Councilmembers, joined by transit advocates and riders, introduced a resolution calling on city agencies to install “bus clocks” at bus stops across the city. Bus clocks give real-time bus arrival information using digital displays, so that riders know how far away their bus is. New York is behind other cities, including Washington, DC, Albany, and Syracuse, where bus clocks are already in use. Read more »

Behind the Scenes of Participatory Budgeting in District 39

By Rachel Fine of the Participatory Budgeting District Committee 

As a District Committee member, I have been focusing on getting the word out about participatory budgeting and engaging our district’s diverse communities in this process. Although the past few weeks have been a whirlwind of activity getting ready for the neighborhood assemblies, our outreach efforts have targeted a number of communities. Read more »

Self-government's appeal

Brooklyn Daily Eagle
10/03/2012

So who knows our neighborhood needs better than we do? A rhetorical question, of course, but one that gets at the heart of a City Council initiative called Participatory Budgeting.

In 2011-2012, Brad Lander was one of four NYC Councilmembers leading their districts in a program first hatched in Brazil and launched in this country in Chicago. The success of the actions taken in NYC’s four forward-thinking districts led to the program’s doubling—eight councilmembers, representing over one million New Yorkers, have dedicated a total of at least $10 million in NYC discretionary capital funds for the 2012-2013 program. It is we, the constituents, who decide how the money is spent. Read more »

Participatory Budgeting is Back

One year ago, we started an experiment: to give New Yorkers the power to decide how to spend $1 million of their tax dollars on projects in the neighborhood.

That experiment, Participatory Budgeting, was a huge success. Over 3,000 people participated, we received nearly a thousand ideas for projects in the community, and our small voting sites were overwhelmed with eager residents wanting to be part of what the New York Times called “revolutionary civics in action.” The seven projects with the most votes – projects for local schools, libraries, parks, and streets – received City funding and are moving forward.

Now we are starting again, with another $1 million and your great ideas. Read more »

Watch out! Safety on the Brooklyn Bridge walkway

If you’ve walked or biked over the Brooklyn Bridge on a nice day (or just seen the auto insurance commercial featuring bikes dodging an animated gecko on the bridge), you know that the New York landmark is just too crowded for everyone to use it safely.

The elevated path is home to 4,000 pedestrians and 3,100 bicyclists each day according to the Department of Transportation. Although the path is a key part of our city’s bicycle infrastructure and an iconic tourist destination, the limited space cannot accommodate the huge numbers of pedestrians and cyclists. Read more »

Let's expand Brooklyn Bridge's Elevated Path

Today, Councilmembers Brad Lander, Margaret Chin, and Stephen Levin, joined by transportation advocates, announced a proposal to double the width of the Brooklyn Bridge elevated path, a popular tourist destination and bike route for many commuters (proposal attached). On many days, the path is filled beyond capacity, creating an unsafe situation for both pedestrians and cyclists. The councilmembers also announced a competition to design the new path. Read more »