Public Transit and Livable Streets

A more robust, efficient and fully-funded public transportation system is key to sustainable growth for our community, and for the city and region as a whole. At the same time, there are simple things we can do to make our city's streets safe for pedestrians, bikers and drivers alike. With more frequent subway and bus service, with safer and more better-planned streets, we can have both a metropolis that really works, and neighborhoods that are more livable day-to-day.

Watch out! Safety on the Brooklyn Bridge walkway

If you’ve walked or biked over the Brooklyn Bridge on a nice day (or just seen the auto insurance commercial featuring bikes dodging an animated gecko on the bridge), you know that the New York landmark is just too crowded for everyone to use it safely.

The elevated path is home to 4,000 pedestrians and 3,100 bicyclists each day according to the Department of Transportation. Although the path is a key part of our city’s bicycle infrastructure and an iconic tourist destination, the limited space cannot accommodate the huge numbers of pedestrians and cyclists. Read more »

Let's expand Brooklyn Bridge's Elevated Path

Today, Councilmembers Brad Lander, Margaret Chin, and Stephen Levin, joined by transportation advocates, announced a proposal to double the width of the Brooklyn Bridge elevated path, a popular tourist destination and bike route for many commuters (proposal attached). On many days, the path is filled beyond capacity, creating an unsafe situation for both pedestrians and cyclists. The councilmembers also announced a competition to design the new path. Read more »

Here's The Plan For An Expanded Brooklyn Bridge Pedestrian And Bike Path

Gothamist
08/07/2012

Earlier this morning, Councilmembers Brad Lander, Margaret Chin, and Stephen Levin unveiled a proposal to expand the Brooklyn Bridge pedestrian and cycling path, which is such a crowded mess that many cyclists simply refuse to bike over it. Their plan is to create a tangible partition (not just the worthless painted line that's currently in place) to separate cyclists and pedestrians, and to triple the amount of pedestrian walking space. The goal of the expansion is to "make the commute safe, accessible, and enjoyable for pedestrians, cyclists and joggers alike."  Read more »

Drivers Get Away With Murder In NYC, But New Laws Could Finally Change That

Gothamist
08/25/2012

A broad coalition of City Councilmembers who rarely see eye-to-eye on the same issue came together today in an attempt to reform the NYPD's appalling handling of accident investigations. "The NYPD's crash investigation system is fatally flawed," Councilmember Brad Lander said at a City Hall press conference this morning. "40% of the time when someone is killed, nobody even gets a traffic ticket." Indeed, a shocking City Council hearing in February found that the city's Accident Investigation Squad [AIS] will only investigate accidents in which the victim dies or seems likely to die. Read more »

Better transit service - because we worked together

I’m very pleased to report that the MTA – in response to our advocacy – is improving transit service in our neighborhood.

As you’ve probably heard, the MTA has agreed to make the G train 5-stop extension to Church Avenue permanent. The G extension has increased the number of trains running along the Culver line through Kensington, Windsor Terrace, Park Slope, Carroll Gardens, Cobble Hill, and connecting our neighborhoods to Downtown Brooklyn and North Brooklyn. Thousands of people raised their voice in support of Brooklyn’s “Crosstown Local,” and the MTA heard us. Read more »

A city budget we can be proud of

The City Council and Mayor Bloomberg reached an agreement this week on New York City’s Fiscal Year 2013 budget – one that invests in our kids and preserves funding for vital public services.

The City’s $68.7 billion budget is a statement of our priorities, and I am proud that those priorities reflect a deep belief in education (public schools continue to be the largest item by far), in core public services and infrastructure that make sure we have safe and vibrant communities, and in a strong safety net for those who need it (young, old, and in-between).

I’m also excited that, for the first time, the City’s budget includes items that you selected, through participatory budgeting. The seven items – totaling $1 million – that more than 2,200 of you voted for in March are being officially adopted as part of the City’s capital budget this week … and we’re launching a new webpage to keep you posted on their progress. Read more »

Safety Improvements for 15th St. & Bartel-Pritchard Sq.

Park Slope Patch
06/19/2012

Crossing Bartel-Pritchard Square near 15th Street can be dangerous for pedestrians.

But, the Department of Transportation has a proposal for roadway changes that may make crossing near and around the traffic circle easier for pedestrians along with a bike lane for 15th Street.

Councilman Brad Lander, D-Park Slope, has been on a mission to make sure that area, which is right smack between Park Slope and Windsor Terrace, safer for all users. Read more »

Let's Celebrate Kensington

Please join me for a ribbon-cutting for the new “Kensington Plaza” – this Sunday, June 3rd, at 12:30 pm at the intersection of Church Avenue and Beverley Road (in front of Walgreens). This new (albeit small!) public space will add to civic life in Kensington and I am excited to celebrate it with you and your neighbors on Sunday. Read more »

Video: Smart growth stories

Smart Growth America
04/25/2012

Where does change come from? Who comes up with the ideas and proposals needed to reinvigorate neighborhoods?

Ask New York City Councilmember Brad Lander and he’ll tell you.

“The community.”

Read more »