The Environment

The importance of thinking globally and acting locally has never been more apparent. New York City and each of our communities must help lead the way on climate change, and toward a more sustainable way of living. At the community level, creating new parks and greenways, supporting the cause of environmental justice, promoting better transit and alternative modes of transportation, and greening our homes and businesses are just some of the ways we can help make New York one of the most sustainable cities in the world.

Truck stop on Columbia Street pleases locals

A truck drives down Columbia Street
Brooklyn Paper
11/09/2010

Columbia Street residents are thrilled that the beverage trucks that once plied their quiet street have been re-routed onto the Brooklyn–Queens Expressway, bringing to an end a familiar controversy in which locals wrestled with the growing port on the waterfront.

“Phoenix and the Teamsters were willing to adopt a solution that really costs them some money,” said Councilman Brad Lander (D–Park Slope), who was involved in negotiations with the beverage company. “It does add a meaningful amount of time to each of those [truck drivers’] shifts.”

Lander said that several permanent routes are being considered for the trucks once the reconstruction of Van Brunt Street is completed, including keeping the trucks on the BQE, having them travel within the port, or managing the times trucks are allowed to travel on Columbia Street. Read more »

School Food Rocked

Brad in lunch line

On Saturday, my office organized the School Food Rocks conference to bring together parents, educators, students, SchoolFood staff, and food activists to learn about how we can work together to achieve healthier and more sustainable school food throughout District 15.

The conference’s aim was to help schools get started or take next steps in improving their food programs, and to strengthen the network of parents and school leaders working on food issues. As I sat in on many of the workshops, on topics including starting a school garden, educating children and families in nutrition, recycling in the cafeteria, expanding access to healthy food in schools, and working with DOE SchoolFood on healthier options for students, I saw many wonderful presentations and a lot of intelligent and informed conversations. I was really happy to have the opportunity to be a part of this conference, and hope that it will get people energized to work to make school food healthier and more sustainable. I'm looking forward to working with school administrators, teachers, parents and activists to take next steps towards getting better food in the schools. Feel free to get in touch with Jessica Turner in my office at 718-499-1090 or JTurner [at] Council [dot] NYC [dot] gov if you would like to continue working with us on this issue. Read more »

Reducing my energy use, #1: Getting started

Now that we're in the thick of our "reduce your use" green homes challenge, I've got some real incentives. I'd like to save a little money, and help to reduce NYC's carbon footprint. And I don't expect to win, but my family and I sure don't want to come in last!

For the first month, we were looking for the "low−hanging fruit" – easy steps to get started. Read more »

City Council-sponsored town hall meeting on hyrdo-fracking

On Monday night, I took part in a Town Hall meeting sponsored by the New York City Council on the issue of "hydraulic fracturing" -- the untested, unregulated, very risky process of drilling for natural gas deep underground, in a way that could jeopardize the water supply for nearly 10 million New Yorkers. Read more »

Public meeting on Hydrofracking on August 24th

Many of you have contacted my office about your deep opposition to the proposed practice of "hydraulic fracturing" - drilling for natural gas in an extremely risky way that would jeopardize NYC's water supply. Next week is an important chance to make our voices heard on this issue. Read more »

Can this high-power couple become more energy-efficient?

Brad Lander with electronics
The Brooklyn Paper
07/28/2010

Talk about a green party.

Councilman Brad Lander (D–Park Slope) is putting his energy efficient light bulbs where his mouth is, battling his constituents in a yearlong energy-saving competition that aims to reduce electricity throughout his district.

The “Reduce the Use” contest begins on Aug. 1, and is open to any Con Edison customer and resident of Lander’s 39th District — Park Slope, Windsor Terrace, Kensington, Cobble Hill, Carroll Gardens, and Borough Park. Read more »

Cleaner air, less waste

The City Council today passed legislation that helps move New York City forward on two critical issues: reducing air pollution by cleaning up the oil used to heat our homes and buildings, and taking steps to expand and improve recycling for the 21st century. Read more »

Making the region's ports more environmentally sustainable

Earlier this month, at my request, the Waterfronts Committee in the City Council held a hearing on ways to improve air quality at the ports in New York harbor. We heard testimony from the Port Authority, the NYC Economic Development Corp, neighbors of the port, truckers, environmental advocates, and waterfront advocates. During my campaign, I made a promise to advance policies to make our port the greenest on the East Coast, and this was the beginning of that effort.