Carroll Gardens

Elected Officials Advocate on Proposed Carroll Gardens Shelter

Many constituents have contacted my office this about the news that Housing Solutions USA (a social services organization) intends to open a 170-bed homeless shelter at 165 West 9th Street, between Court Street & Hamilton Avenue, in Carroll Gardens, in partnership with the NYC Department of Homeless Services (DHS). 

As a lifelong housing advocate, I believe strongly in the right to shelter.  I also know that every neighborhood - including Carroll Gardens - has a role to play in housing our homeless neighbors. But I have real concerns about this proposal. Read more »

Response from Dept of Homeless Services on Shelter Proposal

Last Tuesday, I joined with Borough President Marty Markowitz, State Senator Daniel Squadron, and Assemblywoman Joan Millman to send a joint letter to DHS to demand that the Department of Homeless Services provide written responses, by the close of business last Friday, October 19th, to our numerous questions about this proposal – primarily how the City intends to squeeze 170 people into a 10-unit building, with no plans provided for social services or security, and dis Read more »

Officials Voice Concerns about Carroll Gardens Shelter Proposal

Many constituents have contacted my office over the last week about the news that Housing Solutions USA (a social services organization) intends to open a 170-bed homeless shelter at 165 West 9th Street, between Court Street & Hamilton Avenue, in Carroll Gardens in partnership with the NYC Department of Homeless Services (DHS). Read more »

Self-government's appeal

Brooklyn Daily Eagle
10/03/2012

So who knows our neighborhood needs better than we do? A rhetorical question, of course, but one that gets at the heart of a City Council initiative called Participatory Budgeting.

In 2011-2012, Brad Lander was one of four NYC Councilmembers leading their districts in a program first hatched in Brazil and launched in this country in Chicago. The success of the actions taken in NYC’s four forward-thinking districts led to the program’s doubling—eight councilmembers, representing over one million New Yorkers, have dedicated a total of at least $10 million in NYC discretionary capital funds for the 2012-2013 program. It is we, the constituents, who decide how the money is spent. Read more »

Big Trouble in Little Gowanus?

Carroll Gardens Patch
09/18/2012

A block-wide rental building has been proposed at the old Toll Brothers project site that would nearly double the number of residential units and rise, at its highest point, to 12 stories. All this, with seemingly little input from community officials despite sitting on top of a Superfund site. Read more »

Participatory Budgeting is Back

One year ago, we started an experiment: to give New Yorkers the power to decide how to spend $1 million of their tax dollars on projects in the neighborhood.

That experiment, Participatory Budgeting, was a huge success. Over 3,000 people participated, we received nearly a thousand ideas for projects in the community, and our small voting sites were overwhelmed with eager residents wanting to be part of what the New York Times called “revolutionary civics in action.” The seven projects with the most votes – projects for local schools, libraries, parks, and streets – received City funding and are moving forward.

Now we are starting again, with another $1 million and your great ideas. Read more »

Back to (Our) Schools

This morning, over 1 million kids (including my two) head back to New York City’s public schools.

Despite the often-contentious rhetoric surrounding education policy these days, our public schools for me remain the shining hope of American democracy: that we all work together – through government, with our tax dollars – to invest heavily in the idea that every single kid deserves an equal opportunity to learn and grow, that diversity is a core strength, that we help individuals achieve their potential through collective action, and that knowledge, ideas, and the search for truth matter. Those are not the values of the marketplace (though good education is certainly essential to a thriving economy); they are the values of democracy. Read more »

Watch out! Safety on the Brooklyn Bridge walkway

If you’ve walked or biked over the Brooklyn Bridge on a nice day (or just seen the auto insurance commercial featuring bikes dodging an animated gecko on the bridge), you know that the New York landmark is just too crowded for everyone to use it safely.

The elevated path is home to 4,000 pedestrians and 3,100 bicyclists each day according to the Department of Transportation. Although the path is a key part of our city’s bicycle infrastructure and an iconic tourist destination, the limited space cannot accommodate the huge numbers of pedestrians and cyclists. Read more »

Let's expand Brooklyn Bridge's Elevated Path

Today, Councilmembers Brad Lander, Margaret Chin, and Stephen Levin, joined by transportation advocates, announced a proposal to double the width of the Brooklyn Bridge elevated path, a popular tourist destination and bike route for many commuters (proposal attached). On many days, the path is filled beyond capacity, creating an unsafe situation for both pedestrians and cyclists. The councilmembers also announced a competition to design the new path. Read more »

Better transit service - because we worked together

I’m very pleased to report that the MTA – in response to our advocacy – is improving transit service in our neighborhood.

As you’ve probably heard, the MTA has agreed to make the G train 5-stop extension to Church Avenue permanent. The G extension has increased the number of trains running along the Culver line through Kensington, Windsor Terrace, Park Slope, Carroll Gardens, Cobble Hill, and connecting our neighborhoods to Downtown Brooklyn and North Brooklyn. Thousands of people raised their voice in support of Brooklyn’s “Crosstown Local,” and the MTA heard us. Read more »