Gowanus

“Bridging Gowanus” Community Planning Process Moves Into Next Phase

New website at BridgingGowanus.com, online survey, open houses invite residents to update and prioritize recommendations for a sustainable, livable, inclusive future for the Gowanus area

NYC Department of City Planning to begin working with community on planning and land use framework this Fall

Brooklyn, NY –The next phase in the Bridging Gowanus community planning process launched today, providing new ways for community members to prioritize recommendations that were developed over 20 public meetings (including ideas for public investments, land use regulations, zoning designations, and programs). First convened in August 2013, Bridging Gowanus is a community planning process to shape a sustainable, livable, and inclusive future for the Gowanus neighborhood – in the face of ongoing change, the Superfund cleanup, and real estate pressure. Read more »

Bridging Gowanus: A Brief Introduction

Since August 2013, we have been grappling with important questions through the “Bridging Gowanus” community planning process. Across dozens of meetings, more than 300 stakeholders – including long-time and newer homeowners, tenants, and NYCHA residents, small business owners, environmental activists, artists, affordable housing advocates – identified broadly-shared goals, discussed diverse viewpoints, and built consensus around a planning framework for the Gowanus area. The complete Bridging Gowanus Community Planning Framework is available here

The issues we face in Gowanus are serious ones: How do we confront the legacy of industrial pollution, and the challenges of climate change and resiliency? How can we create inclusive neighborhoods – with room for working- and middle-class families, for public housing, for artists, for manufacturing – amidst skyrocketing real estate values? What’s the right balance of housing and jobs? Can we preserve, (or even strengthen) the mixed-use, eclectic, creative character of the neighborhood amidst change?

The posts below provide a series of updates on issues facing Gowanus, including describing the work that’s been done to make progress, and outlining the work that remains. Read more »

Save the Date: Planning for Resiliency and Sustainability in Gowanus

The second public meeting in the NYC Department of City Planning’s Gowanus PLACES study will focus on grounding our planning work in the critical issues of resiliency and sustainability – including the risks of flooding (from sea level rise, storm surge, and rain), the EPA’s Superfund cleanup, and what we can do to make Gowanus a model of environmental sustainability.

Gowanus PLACES Meeting on Environmental Resiliency and Sustainability
Thursday, December 8, 2016
6:30 PM
Wyckoff Gardens Community Center
280 Wyckoff St 9 (at 3rd Ave)

For the better part of two centuries, the Gowanus Canal functioned as both sewer and symbol of our country’s environmental neglect, as industrial pollution, the toxic waste of making energy through coal gasification, and combined sewer overflows (CSOs) poured into the Canal. The dissolved oxygen level in the Canal reached zero in about 1904, and stayed that way for most of the past century. Read more »

From the depths of the Gowanus Canal...

Yesterday afternoon, the EPA dipped their toes—or, more accurately, a 100,000-pound hydraulic excavator—into the depths of the Gowanus Canal, and began removing the decades of debris that has accumulated there.

Looking into those dark waters, we’ve all wondered what lies beneath. This week we'll start to find out: from sunken vessels, to discarded tires and bikes, and at least one very wet art project. (For more detail, here is a fact sheet from the EPA.)

Here on dry land, we are moving forward to answer questions about the Gowanus Canal area by coming together to shape its future. This Thursday evening, the NYC Department of City Planning will hold a kick-off meeting to introduce their Gowanus neighborhood planning study (or “PLACES” study), which will build upon the ground work our community laid together through the Bridging Gowanus community planning process. Read more »

Save the Date: Kick-Off of Gowanus Neighborhood Planning Process

Over the past three years, neighborhood leaders, community groups, elected officials, and hundreds of you have come together to envision a sustainable, livable, and inclusive future for the area around the Gowanus Canal. The "Bridging Gowanus" community planning process has laid a solid foundation of thoughtful, community-led planning and strong public action to shape our neighborhood.

Now, beginning this fall, the NYC Department of City Planning (DCP) will convene a series of conversations in our community—to build upon our work together though Bridging Gowanus, and develop plans for the future of the area. On Thursday October 27, DCP will host a kick-off meeting for the Gowanus neighborhood planning study: 

Kick-Off Meeting: Gowanus Neighborhood Planning Study
with the NYC Department of City Planning
Thursday October 27th at 6:30 pm
PS 32 – 317 Hoyt St, at Union St
More information here  (under “How can I get involved?”) Read more »

The future we want for Gowanus: help us get there

A few short years ago, the future for Gowanus looked bleak. The canal was toxic, with no plan to clean it up. Businesses were on the decline. New housing on 4th Avenue displaced existing residents, was zero percent affordable, and featured ground-floor parking garage grilles blighting the streetscape.

We’re making some genuine progress. Thanks to the EPA’s Superfund process, a real cleanup is on the way. New businesses are springing up – light manufacturing, artists, materials re-use, co-working, and more. We’ve got funding in the budget for new parks and schools.  

Now, we face new challenges. Real estate pressures threaten manufacturing businesses, artists, and affordable housing. Current trends will yield more hotels, self-storage facilities, and big-box stores which do little to strengthen our neighborhood. Long-term disinvestment in infrastructure means streets that flood, dilapidated public housing, and a continued need for schools, open space, and transit.

So the next steps – in shaping the future for Gowanus we want – are up to us. Read more »

Springtime in Gowanus: Big steps forward toward a healthier canal

At the end of 2015, I wrote to you with a (rather in depth) update on the Gowanus Canal cleanup. I’m happy to report that, this month, we took another big step forward toward a healthier canal. We are also working hard to involve community members in the cleanup efforts

As part of the Superfund cleanup process, the EPA has required that the City of New York construct two large sewage retention tanks in Gowanus—in order to dramatically reduce the amount of sewage that flows into the canal when it rains. On April 15, the EPA and the City announced a proposed agreement on the location of those tanks: an eight-million gallon tank will be built on privately-owned property along the Canal, between Butler and Degraw Streets, and a smaller four-million gallon tank will be located on a City-owned property at 2nd Avenue and 5th Streets. Read more »

Local Elected Officials Welcome EPA/DEP Agreement on Gowanus CSO Retention Tanks

For Immediate Release                                                                                              April 22, 2016

 

Local Elected Officials Issue Statement Welcoming Agreement between U. S. Environmental Protection Agency and NYC Department of Environmental Protection on Gowanus CSO Retention Tanks:

Will Dramatically Reduce Sewage Flowing Into the Canal While Fully Preserving Thomas Greene Park and Increasing Open Space

BROOKLYN, NY -- In advance of a public meeting on Monday, April 25, New York City Council Member Brad Lander, New York City Council Member Stephen Levin, Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams, and New York State Assembly Member Jo Anne Simon, issued the following statement:

"We welcome the agreement between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the NYC Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) on the location of two sewage and stormwater retention tanks in Gowanus, Brooklyn. Construction of these two large retention tanks is an essential component of the Gowanus Canal Superfund cleanup, to reverse over a century of environmental degradation and neglect that made the Gowanus Canal one of the most contaminated water bodies in the country. Together, the two retention tanks will achieve an estimated reduction of 58 to 78 percent of the combined sewage discharges (CSO) that flow into the Gowanus Canal today. Read more »

Don’t drive into the Gowanus. Help us improve the parks instead!

First things first: don’t drive your car into the Gowanus Canal – as an out-of-state, hit-and-run driver did over the weekend, after he hit a parked car and slightly injured a woman and her infant daughter (all three of them are going to be fine, and he was taken into custody).

A better way to get involved in Gowanus: work with us to improve the parks and open space in the neighborhood.  

As one part of my office’s “Bridging Gowanus” initiative, we’re working to create, upgrade, and connect public open space throughout the neighborhood. The long-term goal is a “Gowanus Greenscape” that would connect a series of parks, plazas, canal-front open space, safe places to walk and bike, public art, and a clean, publicly-accessible canal.

We’ve got a long way to go toward that vision, but – thanks to the work of some great partners, especially the Gowanus Canal Conservancy, the Gowanus Alliance, and Gowanus by Design – we’re off to a great start. Read more »

Ennis Playground – What’s your vision?

You might have seen that that last year, my office—together with Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams—allocated $1.85 million in public funding to renovate Ennis Playground -- located between 11th & 12th Streets and 2nd & 3rd Avenues in Gowanus. We’re working together with the NYC Parks Department to upgrade the entire park over the next few years, including the children’s play area, basketball courts, and seating area. Read more »